Dirty Energy

A cavalcade of dirty energy projects in Colorado headwaters are polluting streams and watershed lands and creating a legacy of clean-up costs and habitat headaches for decades to come.
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Water Diversions

Massive quantities of new Colorado River water diversions are being proposed in Utah, Colorado and Wyoming that will reduce water availability for both people in the lower basin and fish and wildlife species across the West.
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Climate Change

Although climate change is increasing the frequency of droughts and reducing Colorado River water flows, many headwater communities are ignoring this problem and even exacerbating these impacts through their business-as-usual policies.
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  • WATER DIVERSIONS ARE DRAINING THE COLORADO
    WATER DIVERSIONS ARE DRAINING THE COLORADO
  • CLIMATE CHANGE FURTHER THREATENS ALREADY DWINDLING WATER RESOURCES
    CLIMATE CHANGE FURTHER THREATENS ALREADY DWINDLING WATER RESOURCES
  • RESERVOIRS ARE DRYING UP
    RESERVOIRS ARE DRYING UP
  • DIRTY ENERGY IN THE UPPER COLORADO THREATENS WATERS SUPPLIES
    DIRTY ENERGY IN THE UPPER COLORADO THREATENS WATERS SUPPLIES
  • DIRTY ENERGY = DIRTY WATER
    DIRTY ENERGY = DIRTY WATER
  • FRACKING IS NOT WORTH THE COST
    FRACKING IS NOT WORTH THE COST
  • THE COLORADO RIVER PROVIDES WATER FOR MILLIONS OF PEOPLE
    THE COLORADO RIVER PROVIDES WATER FOR MILLIONS OF PEOPLE
  • YOUR COLORADO RIVER WATER SUPPLY IS THREATENED
    YOUR COLORADO RIVER WATER SUPPLY IS THREATENED

The Colorado River needs you

Over 80 percent of the total flows of the Colorado River come from the headwater states of Utah, Colorado and Wyoming.  That’s why what happens in these states has big impacts upon the water supply for millions of people in California, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico and Mexico.

Colorado River headwater states are being inundated by thousands of proposed oil and gas wells, tar sands, oil shale and other dirty energy projects that threaten to pollute precious water supplies and habitat for thousands of species of fish and wildlife. New proposed water diversions of Colorado River headwaters also threaten to dry up flows downstream for people and wildlife, even as drought grips the lower portions of the basin.

Worse yet, rising temperatures are shrinking headwater snowpacks and reducing water flows, thereby compounding the impacts of pollution and proposed river diversions.  Whether you love these precious headwaters, the hard-working Colorado River, or your water supply, it’s time to act.

Last Rush for the Wild West

Screen-Shot-2014-09-04-at-5.53.05-PM-930x480In January 2014, Governor Brown announced a State of Emergency: California is having the worst drought in recorded history. Nine months later, Los Angeles has not decreased water use, and Angelinos are still using 122-129 gallons of water per day.

More than 80% of LA’s water is imported, including water from the mighty Colorado River.

Los Angeles Waterkeeper is spreading the word about the severity of the drought and doing their part to conserve water with the “Go dirty for the drought” Dirty Car Pledge to conserve water!

What Can I Do?

With a river as large as the Colorado and challenges equally huge, we need an all-hands-on-deck approach to help keep the Colorado alive and healthy while supplying water to communities in the southwest.

Sign up to receive timely emails about things you can do, request a presentation for your community, and take timely online actions here.

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